Articles tagged with: Iron Age

Revisiting WWII at Longhedge

on Friday, 04 July 2014. Posted in Archaeology, Military

Archaeologists are often thought only to be interested in very old remains – and those are very important to us – but we are also interested in more modern finds and features too. Too often we think we already know everything about events that have happened within living memory, but it’s surprising how often things turn up that have been forgotten, at least within the public record.


Longehedge is an area of land to the north of the Old Sarum Airfield. Old Sarum airfield has a long and illustrious military history. Our original interest in Longhedge was sparked by an Iron Age settlement that appears on aerial photographs. Initial geophysical survey showed the enclosed Iron Age settlement, but also lots of other interesting and unusual features that appeared to be military in origin.


So, in order to get some more information about all of these interesting features, a trenched evaluation was undertaken. The results from the geophysical surveys and trial trenches were mapped (below) and show the iron age and modern features.

Wiltshire Archaeology and Conservation Fair

on Thursday, 27 June 2013.

On Sunday 14th July the History Centre is hosting a Wiltshire-wide event for this years’ Festival of Archaeology. The Archaeology and Conservation teams have joined forces to organise an event which will give visitors plenty of opportunities to get more involved in archaeology in Wiltshire. Whether you want to join a club, attend a course, volunteer, gain work experience, have a go at field work or just find out more about this fascinating subject this free event has it all.

With 20 organisations bringing stands the fair will have plenty to interest visitors of all ages including activities for children, objects to handle and information from university courses, archaeological units, world heritage sites, the Young Archaeologists’ Clubs and the Council for British Archaeology. A full list of organisations attending the fair can be found on our events page.

A new Bronze Age barrow and associated burials, plus a roundhouse!

on Saturday, 18 May 2013. Posted in Archaeology

In 2010 and 2011, some geophysical and trenched evaluation was carried out at a site near the Woodbury Iron Age Settlements Scheduled Ancient Monument. This revealed some undated pits and an extension of the prehistoric field systems that are known to be present in the area, which are thought to relate to the Woodbury settlement. Although the initial results were unpromising, a fragment of human bone in one of the fills from the pits suggested that there might be more to this site than met the eye. Wessex Archaeology undertook the work for this site.

Once the site had been stripped of the topsoil, it became clear that there was more here than had been thought initially. The first and most obvious feature was the remains of a round barrow. The barrow was only now visible as a circular brown ditch cut into the white chalk. This picture shows the barrow, with the later Iron Age ditch running through it. This suggests that, unlike many other contemporary barrows, the mound for this one had been levelled before the Iron Age use of the land had started. In the base of the ditch was a a placed layer of flint pieces and part of an antler time, which may well have been used as a pick when the ditch was dug out.

The Gravels Give Up Their Secrets!

on Friday, 15 March 2013. Posted in Archaeology

Over the last thirty years gravel has been commercially extracted from the North East of Wiltshire in the Upper Thames Valley, close to the border with Gloucestershire. This has always been a landscape rich with natural resources and has been exploited by human communities since time began. The gravel extraction has clearly changed the appearance of the landscape with the subsequent creation of lakes, many of which now make up the Cotswold Water Park.

The scale of this gravel extraction and the planning requirement for the developer to fund archaeological excavation has led to an unprecedented opportunity for archaeologists to investigate and record vast area of landscape settled and used by past communities. In the last 10 years three projects in particular have had amazing findings and over 100 hectares of land has been archaeologically investigated.

<<  1 2 [3

logos1

Accredited Archive Service