Articles tagged with: Lacock

Cats of Lacock

on Friday, 29 April 2016. Posted in Archives, Wiltshire People, Wiltshire Places

When I visited Lacock recently, I was privileged to meet the lovely Morag, whom I had seen featured a few times on the National Trust’s Facebook page and was delighted to meet in person. She was taking this in her stride, used to being fussed over, as one of the resident cats of Lacock.
Morag and bunny. Image courtesy of National Trust Images - Alana Wright

The Lacock archive is as full of references to cats as there are currently cats living in and around the abbey. Although these are mostly photographs, there are also text references to cats. The earliest reference I’ve found is from the 19th century. Charles Henry Talbot, who owned Lacock from 1877, kept most of the letters written to him (although sadly didn’t make copies of the ones he sent) and from there we can find several interesting references to his home life and relationships with his family and friends – and animals! We know from correspondence that Charles had at least two cats in the last part of the 19th century, called Stripy and Bunny. It appears that he was very fond of them. Matilda Talbot, who inherited Lacock from her uncle Charles, was equally fond of them and many photographs of cats have appeared from amongst her papers.

In a letter to his uncle of 1893, William Gilchrist-Clark advises Charles regarding the mange that his pet is suffering from: “On my way from Brighton I heard of your cat’s illness. I said to Auntie Monie [Rosamond Talbot] that I thought it must be mange, and she asks me by letter this morning to write to you about it. I thought the cat was not in a healthy state when I saw it in Jan – the hair was too matted and it didn’t look right. The regular vet is laid up, but I am sure the best thing you could do would be to have the matted hair cut off as much as possible and the skin dressed with sulphur and hair oil – the cat would be in an unpleasant state for a bit and would hardly do for the house – but if it was kept in a stable for a bit it would soon feel right again – you could get the dressing from any local vet, and at the same time find out if it was the best thing to use – I always use it for dogs myself.” Personally, I think the first thing I’d do is visit the vet, and find out if it was suitable before I even considered buying the dressing. But it is interesting to see how people dealt with animals’ illnesses. Charles must have been very worried about his cat, and William likewise as he wrote to him so quickly. Let’s hope the strange concoction for the cat’s skin worked, and 1893’s “Grumpy Cat” (I would be if I was kept in a stable and dressed with sulphur) got over his mange and his health improved!

 

2664/3/1B/125, letter 10

A letter from Rosamond Talbot to Charles of 1898 suggests that Charles has had to find a new home for one of his cats due to it possibly hunting his chickens, and she is helping: “We think that a good home has offered for poor old Bunny, in Somersetshire – people who want a grown up tame cat, so I must see about it when I get home. I cannot think that she has been interfering with the chickens again, now that they are grown so much older – besides she has been so constantly and carefully kept indoors during the middle of the day when the chickens are free, but still it is best to be on the safe side, if we can, for the future. Do you think the fox has put in an appearance again?” The phrase “poor old Bunny” is very apt here. It appears that the poor cat was rehomed as a scapegoat for the fox, although we cannot rule out the possibility of Bunny being a natural hunter and deciding that actually, grown-up chickens were also quite appealing. It is not known if Bunny was eventually rehomed. Maybe Charles decided to just be a bit more careful about where she was kept in relation to the chickens. 

My Mondays at the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre and other activities

on Friday, 09 October 2015. Posted in Archives

Ann has been working every Monday at the History Centre for several years. Ann has also been involved with Wiltshire People First, a disabled people’s user led Self Advocacy (speaking up for yourself) organisation, with a Management Committee made up of people with learning difficulties. They work to make sure people with learning difficulties in Wiltshire have a voice and are treated fairly and included. One of their activities is the Heritage Lottery Fund project ‘Our lives, Our History’ researching the history, lives and experience of people with learning difficulties, including the history of the former St George’s Hospital, now the location of the Wiltshire People First offices. Ann also took part in the History Centre’s Lacock Unlocked project activity with Wiltshire People First, learning about digital photography and early experiments in photography.

Here is Ann’s first blog for the History Centre:

I like to work here because the people are very nice to me who work with me and I like to do all my jobs. I do lots of jobs and I like working with Terry and Ros because they are very nice and understand my learning difficulties. They are very good with me and I like both of them. I tidy the Reception area, I help with the post, I do photocopying and folding, I help to get the Education Room ready for meetings, I do some filing and help to greet visitors. We get on well together and people help me to do my jobs. My job and the people I like very much. I have some days holiday from work and I go clothes shopping, Pub nights on a Wednesday and I go to Longleat where I have a pass. I get money from work to pay for things. I use a bus pass to get around.

I go to Wiltshire People First to talk about St Georges where I used to live 29 years ago. We talk about me living there, I can’t remember a lot but I can remember some things.

Transforming Archives and Developing Community

on Monday, 28 September 2015. Posted in Archives

For the past year I have been based at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre for my National Archives 'Transforming Archives' traineeship where I have been developing a community archive for the village of Lacock. It has been a fantastic opportunity to gain new skills and develop existing ones. These have included using Joomla (website software), training and managing volunteers, arranging events, advertising, interviewing residents, project management skills, amid many others. For me, the most exciting part of my traineeship was meeting the local residents of Lacock and others in the surrounding areas.   The enthusiasm they held for their village, history and community was startling and was something that I have never experienced in the places that I have lived. The friendliness and willingness to welcome myself and my volunteers into their homes to share their memories, stories and photographs of Lacock was wonderful. It has been a privilege to be able to learn more about this small and close community, over the last year, which is sadly under threat from the continuing rise of tourism and the demands that this entails.

The Lacock Community Archive has collected fifty-two oral history interviews from those within Lacock and the surrounding areas concerning evacuees, American soldiers, Lacock School, fetes and fairs or Manor Farm (located in the village) which no longer exists. Memories have ranged from dressing up as a swine herdsman son at the Lacock Pageant of 1932 to delivering papers to the Abbey.   The interviewees have ranged from teenagers in the village to those who have lived there for their entire lives and whose family goes back generations within the village. In addition to this, over five hundred copies of various photographs and documents have been collected from the community and uploaded to the Lacock website for everybody to view. These include photographs of sport teams, weddings, the old Working Men's Club and events such as the millennium procession. Hopefully, both the oral history interviews and collection of photographs will prove to be a useful historical resource and will continue being a means to share information about the village.  

The life of Ela, Countess of Salisbury

on Tuesday, 15 September 2015. Posted in Archives

Ela, Countess of Salisbury was a very interesting woman and this blog will look at her life, particularly relating to Lacock Abbey, which she founded in 1232.

Ela was born in Amesbury in 1187 and inherited the title of Countess of Salisbury as well as many lands and estates in 1196 when her father died, and at that time she was only nine years old. After her husband William died, she assumed the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire as well, which he had held.

Her early life is a bit blurred: following her succession to her father’s title, it appears she was taken to Normandy and imprisoned there. This may have been her mother’s family, so it may therefore have not been a prison: it is possible that she and her mother both travelled to Normandy and remained there with their family. Whatever the action, though, this was a secret place: it was not intended that she should be found. It has been suggested that the reason for this was to save Ela from possible danger from her father’s brother Philip. Bowles and Nicholls, in the book Annals and antiquities of Lacock Abbey, say that this suggestion “would account for her daughter’s confinement by an anxious and affectionate mother, that she might be placed out of reach of those who perhaps might have meditated worse than confinement”. Anyway, she was taken from the legal wardship of the King and hidden in Normandy. An English knight called William Talbot decided to go and rescue her and went to France dressed as a pilgrim. He then changed his disguise to enter the Court after he discovered where she was kept, and eventually managed to take her back to England where he presented her to King Richard. It was Richard who then arranged for her marriage to William Longspee, who was Richard’s illegitimate half-brother and probably about 13 years older than Ela.

William and Ela were probably engaged when her father died and she became the King’s ward, but weren’t married until she came of age. William then became Earl of Salisbury, taking his father-in-law’s title, and also Sheriff of Wiltshire. Together, they laid foundation stones for Salisbury Cathedral, in which William was buried a few years later.

The Great Lacock Bake Off

on Monday, 17 August 2015. Posted in Archives

I am an addict. Not alcohol or drugs, but cake is my particular addiction – coffee and walnut being my favourite. Along with millions of others I am also addicted to the BBC TV show ‘The Great British Bake-Off’ (which has recently started again) so you can imagine my delight at being able to combine my twin loves of cake and archives in our recent HLF-funded Lacock Unlocked ‘Food and Friendship’ public participation event.

This took place on 29 July 2015 at Lacock village hall and took the form of talks about the history of food by experts Sally Macpherson and Deborah Loader, together with the opportunity for the public to taste those recipes, made to perfection by Alison Williams and Nancy Newman of the Lacock Women’s Institute.

Expert Deborah Loader demonstrates a modern ‘ice house’ for keeping ice cream cool to the author of this blog.

Nancy Newman with an apricot and apple tansey.

Voices of Lacock: Recording History

on Monday, 20 July 2015. Posted in Archives

A fundamental part of the Lacock Community Archive project has been recording the memories of local residents through oral history interviews.  Oral history is a fantastic method of discovering stories that have remained hidden or missed from traditional historical methods. These memories have ranged from hiding American soldiers from the Military Police in the basement of the Red Lion to Mrs Murray (local schoolteacher) who opened her front window curtains so the local children could watch their favourite television programmes.  These vibrant and wonderful memories encapsulate a village community that is often overlooked by the vast number of tourists that flock to the Abbey.

Anthony Edwards

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