Articles tagged with: London

17,000 miles across Soviet Russia

on Thursday, 07 January 2021. Posted in Archives

In the early 1930s, Christopher Fuller (later a director of Jaggards, Corsham) and Duncan Sandys (who would become Winston Churchill’s son-in-law and MP for Norwood) travelled together in what Fuller called ‘a very comprehensive tour of all the more important parts of the entire Soviet Union’. Travelling by foot, plane, train, car and horseback they crossed 17,000 miles of Soviet Russia to explore conditions in the country and the success, or failure, of the Communist experiment.

Map of Fuller and Sandys’ route across Russia (1196/52)

Fuller kept an extensive diary of the trip, which we hold in our extensive collection on Jaggards (1196). Fuller’s diaries (1196/52) are also complemented by around 200 photographs that he took on his journey (1196/53BW) which include images of Leningrad and Moscow, but also of the labour camps that the travellers visited during their trip.

A page from Fuller’s diary showing Russian phrases he tried to learn for the trip (1196/52)

Though the pair visited the major cities, a key aim of their trip was to take in as much of rural Russia as they could, to get a sense for the life of the average Russian ‘peasant’. As such the diaries are not only a fascinating first-hand account of the conditions that ordinary Russians lived in but are also revealing of the extent to which the realities of the heartlands of Russia were almost unknown to the British political class at the time.

The Bus that Went to War

on Friday, 28 October 2016.

We had a recent visitor from the National Association of Road Transport Museums who was interested in our Historic Photograph Collection and wanted particularly to see the two images below of a group outing at Hilperton pictured on a ‘private bus’.

Five men, including the driver, standing in front of a 'private' motor bus carrying passengers, probably during an outing, Hilperton, Wiltshire, 1920-1940 (P53113)

 

The rear of a motor bus carrying passengers, probably during an outing, Hilperton, Wiltshire, 1920-1940 (P53114)

I was intrigued to learn that this bus not only had an interesting past but also an interesting present! It is reg. LH8186 and chassis no. B2737; now known as the ‘Battle Bus’. It has been part of an HLF funded project to restore one of the last surviving B-type buses back to working condition and to its first world wartime appearance.

The London General Omnibus Company B-type bus was introduced in 1910 when buses were mostly still horse-drawn but by 1913 there were 2,500 B-type buses. They had proved themselves to be mechanically reliable and became the first successfully mass-produced motor-bus.

After the outbreak of war in 1914 the buses were commandeered by the War Department along with many of their drivers and mechanics. The buses were protected with wooden boards and painted khaki for camouflage. They were each able to transport 24 soldiers along with their equipment to and from the Front Line and were also used variously as ambulances, lorries and even mobile pigeon lofts! Around 1,200 London General Omnibus vehicles were used in this way, mostly in France and Belgium.

Wiltshire Women of WWI: The Heroine Project Presents DOROTHY LAWRENCE

on Friday, 25 July 2014. Posted in Events, Military

In June 1915, armed only with a bicycle, her wits and a burning journalistic ambition, a young woman named Dorothy Lawrence set out from England determined to reach the frontline of fighting in northern France.

“I’ll see what an ordinary English girl, without credentials or money can accomplish. I’ll see what I can manage as a war correspondent!”

Sleeping in ditches, haystacks and flea-bitten dugouts, Dorothy wheedled, charmed and hoodwinked her way past suspicious gendarmes and the unwanted attentions of frustrated soldiers, to spend ten days under heavy shelling in the French town of Albert shortly before the Battle of Loos.

WWI Evacuees: Research Update

on Saturday, 01 March 2014. Posted in Military

Hello, its Jade again!
Its been just over a month since I last wrote my blog and there have been some great, and interesting developments, some as a result of people reading the blog and getting in touch for which I am very grateful! So I thought I had better get in touch and update you all.

I have now been through all but nine of the school admission registers for the whole of Wiltshire - not an easy task I assure you, but being very close to finishing has made me reflect on what has been discovered along the way. I think it is safe to say that some sort of large scale, organised evacuation of young children out of London was occurring during the war.  While there is plenty of evidence to suggest this, it also has opened up new questions such as; why? how? and where? It is also worth noting that although it looks like this must have been organized on a large scale, it is equally clear that it was not anything to do with the government, or local authorities. This is clear from the lack of information available about the evacuees in any official records.

The First World War Home Front – a forgotten part of the war

on Friday, 07 February 2014. Posted in Military

The Blitz, rationing, evacuees, home guard, women’s land army are all such familiar parts of the story of the Second World War. The home front is well documented, the setting for popular television programmes, taught in primary schools and part of our collective narrative for the Second World War, but most people know very little about the home front during the First World War. Prompted by this year’s centenary and the production of a resource pack for schools, volunteers and staff have been looking into the archives for documents about the Great War. At the request of teachers, we looked into the role of children in the war researching the school log books to find out how the war affected their lives.

WWI Evacuees to Wiltshire: The Untold Story

on Friday, 10 January 2014. Posted in Military

Hello, my name is Jade and I am currently on Placement at Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre from the University of the West of England, as part of my History degree. I am working on a project that is looking at the possibility of children during World War One being evacuated to rural areas, such as Wiltshire. We do not know very much about this as it wasn’t government organised, and there are little records remaining. It seems that there was quite a large influx of Children from London following air raids in 1917, when Zeppelin airships were superseded by the deadly Gotha Biplanes. In the first raid in May 1917 there were 95 casualties and on the 12th of June 1917 100 bombs fell killing 162 civilians, including 16 Children at a school in Poplar which received a direct hit. This seems to have caused an unofficial evacuation of children and families.

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