Articles tagged with: advowson

When is a rectory not a rectory? The story of a parish with three rectories

on Monday, 15 March 2021. Posted in Architecture, Wiltshire Places

Orcheston is a small, quiet parish on Salisbury Plain, close to Shrewton. The river Till meanders through it, diving and reappearing intermittently. The older, traditional buildings are characteristic of many of the Plain’s surrounding villages – a pleasing blend of chequerboard and banded flints, limestone and from the later 18th century, brick. Before 1934 Orcheston was two parishes: Orcheston St George formed the south half, and Orcheston St Mary formed the north half, both existing as separate communities until the two met in the middle during the mid-20th century at Whatcombe Brow. A recommendation to unite the two parishes as far back as 1650 came to nothing.

My involvement came when I was asked to look at The Old Rectory formerly belonging to Orcheston St Mary. As I started to search I realised that there were two buildings in Orcheston St Mary which at one time bore that name – which was the original? Fortunately, the good old Wiltshire Glebe Terrier was expansive on the subject.
The Orcheston St George rectory is also called the Old Rectory. It looks like an early-mid 19th century red brick house, but with evident origins in the 17th century. The Orcheston St Mary Old Rectory is also said to be of 17th century date originally, though an early rectory house was mentioned in the 1530s, and it is this that was likely rebuilt from scratch by Clare College, Cambridge in flint and stone, when they purchased the advowson in the early 18th century. For those not familiar with ecclesiastical law, this meant that whoever owned the advowson could give the job of rector to whoever they wanted. At a time when the heir inherited the family pile and the spare either went into the army or the church, this was a guaranteed income as novelised by Jane Austen in Mansfield Park.

The fortunes of a Wiltshire parish rectory

on Monday, 17 February 2020. Posted in Architecture, Wiltshire People, Wiltshire Places

Stratford Tony is a small village 4 ½ miles from Salisbury. The river Ebble flows through it, and the line of the ancient Roman road known as ‘Icknield Street’ passes close on the west side of the village. The most notable occupant of Stratford Tony was the impressionist painter Wilfrid de Glehn, who lived at the Manor House from 1942 until his death in 1951. The population now only amounts to around 50 people.

Last year Wiltshire Buildings Record was asked to investigate the old rectory, now a private house. The house presented a decorous early Georgian front with views across the lawns to the river below. As ever, we looked beyond the polite elevation to the hidden corners and roof spaces to reveal a very different story. Remains of a c1500 timber-frame were found embedded in replacement stone walls and in the roof which suggested that this was a much more humble farmhouse. Grabbed by the intrigue glands, our researcher Louise did what she does best, which is to squirrel out those hidden facts embedded in layers of old parchment. It turns out that it was quite possibly a grange farm for the Abbey of Lyra in Normandy (nothing to do with His Dark Materials or the constellation of stars!) and then the Priory of Sheen in Richmond, London.

Image of Stratford Tony parish rectory roof showing 16th century timber frame

Its transformation to posh rectory happened in the later 16th century when Lawrence Hyde acquired the advowson (the right to recommend a clergyman to a ‘living’ in the parish) from the Crown in 1560. Lawrence Hyde was part of the influential Hyde family of Wiltshire, he had benefitted greatly from the acquisition of land and property following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. He held a lease from William Earl of Pembroke, of Wardour Castle and Park around the time he was granted the advowson at Stratford Tony. Members of the Hyde family held it for over 126 years up to 1686, when it then transferred to Edward Fawconer of Sarum.

By 1671 the glebe terrier noted a substantial rectory house comprising …A mansion house, a brew house, a wood house, a barn, a stable, a fodder house besides some skillings (cowsheds), an orchard, 2 gardens…. Lawrence and his son Robert Hyde installed three members of their own family as clerks at Stratford Tony. It is very likely, the patronage of the Hyde family resulted in substantial investment in the parsonage house, including the addition of a smart Georgian wing. This was extended further in 1791 by Reverend Stockwell, the rector at that time, who commemorated it with a datestone.

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