Articles tagged with: photography

The Living in Lockdown Wiltshire Collection

on Thursday, 07 October 2021. Posted in Archives, History Centre, Wiltshire People, Wiltshire Places

The Covid pandemic has affected us all. Last year the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre put out a call to arms, asking for contributions to a new collection that we are building; ‘Living in Lockdown: A Creative Response to Challenging Times’. We had an amazing response! A big thank you to everyone who has contacted us with material to include. It’s been exciting to look at the scope and variety of Wiltshire’s responses to the issues we face and continue to grapple with.

I’d like to share with you some of the material we have received to give an idea of not just the variety, but also to show how a collection is created, collated and preserved for the future here at the History Centre. We see our collections as the county’s treasures. The precious knowledge contained within them about you, our county’s residents and communities, and how we have faced the Covid challenge can now be discovered and studied by future generations thanks to your generosity and the facilities here at the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre.

We began our collecting process by sending out details of the project Living in Lockdown via our website and social media channels, utilising the help of some of the other teams we work with, such as the communications team at Wiltshire Council. As soon as the material started to wing its way to us, we began entering it on a spreadsheet; basically an ‘accessions’ record to help us register all the material, document where it came from and where it is being stored at the History Centre. We soon built up hundreds of entries, with donations from History Centre staff and other teams within Wiltshire Council such as Wiltshire Libraries, plus local residents, groups, organisations and creative practitioners living and working in the county.

Many types of formats have been received (paper copies, digital images and documents, CDs) and types of material, from cards, booklets, local newsletters, official letters, drawings, newspaper articles, writing and poems - the list goes on…

collection of dpcuments including newsletters, pamphlets, a green poster with rainbow saying 'stay alert', distancing poster and a hand-drawn annotated illustrations.

The creativity that has come out of these dark times has been wonderful to see. From artworks to music, poetry, writing and photography – it shows how intrinsically intertwined creativity is within us as a positive response to challenge and change, and how valuable and essential culture is to us as human beings and communities. We feel honoured to play our part in this cultural experience.

Cards with poems entitled 'Numbers' and 'Sounds' sit in an folded paper pocket painted to look like a murmuration of birds
The hand made ‘A Book of Pauses’ by Jennie Gilling of Warminster, created as a response to different aspects in the natural world that highlighted our human situation in 2020.
Poster advertising Paul Thomas 'one man band' exhibition of drawings made during lockdown.
Art work by Paul Thomas which formed a collection that was exhibited in Salisbury in 2021.

The type of material will determine where it will sit within the collection. The History Centre is home to an archive and a local studies library. They have distinctive specialisms, for example on a basic level, the library deals with published material and the archive unpublished, but there are also some crossovers, for instance photographs could sit within the Local Studies Historic Photograph and Print collection but also within the archive collection too. We also have a new digital repository for born digital works. This is great for us, as it means the History Centre is well placed to welcome all sorts of material. The only items we can’t take are 3D items which are better placed in one of Wiltshire’s fantastic museums!

Mural on a brick wall with a rainbow leading into a yellow brick road

The Ancestor sculpture, a kneeling figure holding a flag with added mask

Small painted stones placed alongside a path through grass
Photographs taken during lockdown: mural in The Butts, Chippenham, 11.2020, photographed by Michelle Chapman, ‘The Ancestor’ in Amesbury, fully equipped with mask, 11.2020 and the Devizes snake stones, 7.2020, photographed by Wiltshire Library staff

The next stage in the collection’s journey will be for myself as the County Local Studies Librarian and one of my Archivist colleagues to assess the collection and formally decide where everything should be placed (this is called ‘appraisal’). This usually involves a lot of excitement and quite a bit of time, as I know I always find so much of interest, but I must take a proper look at it all – we have to spend time getting it right, don’t we!

The documents and creative items will go into the archives, with the books and pamphlets that have been published finding their home in the local studies library. We have yet to make a decision on the digital material, but it is safe to say it will be stored in the most appropriate location. Anything left over after this process will make a valuable addition to the Ephemera collection in Local Studies. We usually define it as a miscellaneous collection of materials that you might often throw out, but believe me, in the future, these items will be a fantastic source of information…

Creative Wiltshire Exhibition at Salisbury Museum

on Monday, 01 April 2019. Posted in Art, Events, Museums, Wiltshire People

Museum and archive collections are, in their very nature, eclectic. They often have roots in one person’s fascination with the past and they develop and grow much like a tree putting out roots. They are often dependent on donations, and collecting policies within museums are developed to provide some structure to this form of collecting, making sure that very valuable storage space is used to advantage and the best are represented. It is not that often that choices can be made by museum and archive staff about what to purchase, what gaps to fill and who to represent.

The Heritage Lottery Funded Creative Wiltshire project has aimed to facilitate just that. With a carefully prepared bid back in 2014 we were successful in achieving funding to add to some of our Wiltshire collections and with careful consideration we have purchased items that aim to fill gaps, often representing a new creator with a strong Wiltshire connection. We are now reaching the end of this project and our final exhibition at Salisbury Museum will show off some of our recent purchases.

This project is not just about the purchases, it is also about offering training and development to volunteers and staff associated with museums within the county, as well as education workshops, a tool kit for teachers and other events in the wider community. The exhibition at Salisbury Museum has provided a perfect opportunity to put an ‘Exhibitions Assistant Trainee’ in place, to plan, oversee and install the final exhibition with the support of the Salisbury Museum Director, Adrian Green and his team. Thank you to Emily Smith, our successful applicant, who has been able to gain great ‘hands on’ experience of all aspects of exhibition work within a museum context. We gave her a tough brief; expecting planning, curation, exhibition design, mounting of work, co-ordinating staff, borrowing and transferring of objects required from around the county and she has had a busy four months putting this in place. We thank you for your enthusiasm and we are thrilled with the results. The exhibition at Salisbury Museum has now been extended to 29th September 2019; why not pop in and see what you think? You will find work by Rex and Laurence Whistler, Howard Phipps, Nancy Nicholson, Nick Andrew, Jonathan Wylder and Wilfred Gabriel de Glehn, amongst others.

Emily Smith - Exhibitions Assistant Trainee celebrating her work

During the course of the project other exhibitions have been held at Swindon Museum and Art Gallery and Chippenham Museum and both have focused on recent acquisitions to their collections. Sophie Cummings of Swindon Museum and Art Gallery says the project has exceeded her expectations and allowed them to purchase pieces by Ken White, previously un-represented in their collection, as well as fine art by Joe Tilson, Harold Dearden, David Bent and Janet Boulton and ceramics by Katherine Pleydell-Bouverie, Patricia Volk and Sasha Wardell.

The current exhibitions at Swindon Museum and Art Gallery are well worth a visit.

An Art of the People – Ramsbury & Cricklade Potteries features work by Ivan and Kay Martin of Cricklade, and Peter Holdsworth of Ramsbury.

An Art of the People – Ramsbury & Cricklade Potteries

Out of the Box: An exhibition of paintings by David Bent

An exhibition of work by David Bent which includes geometric landscapes, intricate photographic collages and paintings as well as his aviation art and “Movement 2000” series. Stunning and inspiring work by this Swindon based artist.

Wiltshire Buildings Record Needs You!

on Wednesday, 07 February 2018. Posted in Architecture, Wiltshire Places

We are trying to get as many societies and history groups as possible to take photos of traditional farm buildings. The pressure on buildings that have lost their original use is enormous.  Many redundant farm buildings are either converted into homes and offices or face demolition to make way for new development.  Some are left to decay. In an effort to record this rapidly-changing farming landscape we are urging local history group to take a snap-shot or two from the public footpath, road or hill-top and send them in to us. We want to record buildings that have been converted as well as those in their original state, even if still in use. This will give us an indication of the rate of change in Wiltshire, and a record of buildings that may disappear in the future. 

We are not a pressure group that wants to stop change, we merely want to chronicle the changes that occur, and keep the information for future study. We also want to learn from the information submitted, so that people living and working in Wiltshire can understand their built heritage better. Many traditional farmsteads have already been lost to the pressures of development, and maybe nobody will remember what they were like, which is a lost opportunity and a great shame. Once they are gone, they are gone, along with a way of life that has persisted for hundreds of years! If you are interested please contact the office and we can supply you with further details, or just get out there with your camera and snap away, making sure you can identify the farm, and date the photographs.

Dorothy Treasure

Principal Buildings Historian, Wiltshire Buildings Record

Snappers and Gunners: behind the scenes at the Fox Talbot Museum and the Royal Artillery Museum

on Wednesday, 31 May 2017. Posted in Museums

One of the best things about my job is visiting different museums around the county, seeing behind the scenes and finding out about all the exciting things that are happening. Last week I was lucky enough to go to two museums and get a peek at things not normally seen by visitors.

First up was a visit to the Fox Talbot Museum https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock-abbey-fox-talbot-museum-and-village/features/learn-about-the-history-of-photography in Lacock, with the Wiltshire Museum Group. The Museum tells the story of the history of photography, from the very first photographic chemical processes to the modern smartphone. It also celebrates the life and work of William Henry Fox Talbot who lived in Lacock Abbey. A Victorian pioneer of photography, Fox Talbot created the earliest surviving photographic negative, taken in 1835, of a window of the Abbey. Upstairs there’s a gallery with a changing temporary exhibition programme, which explores photography as an art form.

The Fox Talbot Museum
‘Plants in a different light’ www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock-abbey-fox-talbot-museum-and-village/features/plants-in-a-different-light-by-jan-ramscar by Jan Ramscar is the currently temporary exhibition at the Fox Talbot Museum. It features botanical projection photograms, in the spirit of those created by Fox Talbot himself.

Curator Roger Watson, told the group about a current project to acquire and manage the Fenton Collection. Thousands of photographs from the 19th and 20th centuries were collected by James Fenton, along with a wide range of photographic technologies – including cameras, exposure meters and stereoscopic viewers. He displayed them in his own Museum of Photography on the Isle of Man, before donating them to the Museum of the Moving Image in 1986. All the items had been in storage since the museum closed in 1999 and last year the British Film Institute had donated them to the National Trust’s Fox Talbot Museum.

Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund www.hlf.org.uk and the Prism Fund www.artscouncil.org.uk/funding/prism  the project has brought the collection to Lacock, where it is being catalogued and cared for, including being re-housed in a newly created store.

Store in a barn

The new store is built inside one of the traditional buildings in Lacock – from the outside you wouldn’t be able to tell what’s kept within. A room has been built inside the barn to house the objects. This is insulated to help keep the environment stable and the conditions the best possible to ensure the preservation of all the treasures kept within.

The new store
Volunteers Ros and Annette cataloguing photographs from the Fenton Collection at the Fox Talbot Museum. In the public area of the museum, they are happy to chat to visitors about what they’re doing and help people understand how museum collections are looked after.

My Mondays at the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre and other activities

on Friday, 09 October 2015. Posted in Archives

Ann has been working every Monday at the History Centre for several years. Ann has also been involved with Wiltshire People First, a disabled people’s user led Self Advocacy (speaking up for yourself) organisation, with a Management Committee made up of people with learning difficulties. They work to make sure people with learning difficulties in Wiltshire have a voice and are treated fairly and included. One of their activities is the Heritage Lottery Fund project ‘Our lives, Our History’ researching the history, lives and experience of people with learning difficulties, including the history of the former St George’s Hospital, now the location of the Wiltshire People First offices. Ann also took part in the History Centre’s Lacock Unlocked project activity with Wiltshire People First, learning about digital photography and early experiments in photography.

Here is Ann’s first blog for the History Centre:

I like to work here because the people are very nice to me who work with me and I like to do all my jobs. I do lots of jobs and I like working with Terry and Ros because they are very nice and understand my learning difficulties. They are very good with me and I like both of them. I tidy the Reception area, I help with the post, I do photocopying and folding, I help to get the Education Room ready for meetings, I do some filing and help to greet visitors. We get on well together and people help me to do my jobs. My job and the people I like very much. I have some days holiday from work and I go clothes shopping, Pub nights on a Wednesday and I go to Longleat where I have a pass. I get money from work to pay for things. I use a bus pass to get around.

I go to Wiltshire People First to talk about St Georges where I used to live 29 years ago. We talk about me living there, I can’t remember a lot but I can remember some things.

Voices of Lacock: Recording History

on Monday, 20 July 2015. Posted in Archives

A fundamental part of the Lacock Community Archive project has been recording the memories of local residents through oral history interviews.  Oral history is a fantastic method of discovering stories that have remained hidden or missed from traditional historical methods. These memories have ranged from hiding American soldiers from the Military Police in the basement of the Red Lion to Mrs Murray (local schoolteacher) who opened her front window curtains so the local children could watch their favourite television programmes.  These vibrant and wonderful memories encapsulate a village community that is often overlooked by the vast number of tourists that flock to the Abbey.

Anthony Edwards

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